Will I be to slow?

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I am running my first marathon in April and have up to now be concentrating on my training and distance. I am following a beginner programme and am up to 7 miles for my long runs (I am on track), I have now begun to worry about my speed. I am a very slower runner and the 7 miles took me around 1 hour 45 mins. I average at around 10 mins for 1km. I am wondering how you increase speed do I just push a bit harder I don't want to over do it and get an injury and at the moment i am running a comfortable pace.

Posted 25.01.13, 10:15pm

Hey you are not gonna win the race but then nor are any of us. We all get the same medal and t shirt

The great thing about London is there are runners of all speeds and abilities. If your goal is to get round then I wouldn't worry at all about the pace you do it in as long as you are comfortable and enoy the experience.

At about 7 hour pace you will find it  along day and certainly by the end of teh race there will be less support, runners etc, but you are unlikely to be entirely alone and there will be people after you.

At present I really wouldnt think about trying to get faster - your main goal at moment is building up time on feet.

BTW have you thought about  aRun/Walk strategy? Many people could get round faster and more comfortably with Run/Walk from start. Wortha thought. 

Posted 25.01.13, 10:25pm

Sloan don't worry about it. I'm not a fast runner either. I finished my first Marathon in 6hrs 19. The experience for me was overwhelming and I left London with only happy memories. I've been trying to speed up a little but it's taking a long time!!  There are always other folk around you. Dont beat yourself up about not being as fast. You get the same medal as everyone else.

Posted 26.01.13, 2:27pm

Sloan, you just run your OWN race and get that medal that you've worked so hard for!  None of us first timers know how it'll be on the day so relax and enjoy!  Good luck, take it easy and BE on that start line, see you there Smile xx

Posted 26.01.13, 3:07pm

Keep doing what you are doing and stick to your training plan.

 

Do not worry about your time. You will naturally start to run quicker without even thinking about it as you get further and further along your training schedule.

 

If you push too hard too early you will never even make it to the start line.

 

P.S. Look at my picture. That knee is a result of not sticking to the training plan. It was a very long and painful walk across London for me to pick up my medal last year.

Posted 26.01.13, 5:07pm

One of the good things about London is that no speed is too slow, and there will still be people behind you, even if it takes 7 hours to finish.  Katie Price did that sort of time a couple of years ago.  While I'm not her biggest fan, I admire her for sticking at it and making sure she finished.  Compare that with the efforts of those "elite" athletes who decide they are not going to win so drop out after 15 miles or so - and some of them are PAID for being there.

One tip I would give, especially if it's a warm day: get yourself a water bottle you can carry with you as some of the drinks stations do run out, and you would not want to go three quarters of an hour between drinks if you get really unlucky.

Posted 26.01.13, 5:39pm

Quoted from deanshepherd:

Keep doing what you are doing and stick to your training plan.

 

Do not worry about your time. You will naturally start to run quicker without even thinking about it as you get further and further along your training schedule.

 

If you push too hard too early you will never even make it to the start line.

 

P.S. Look at my picture. That knee is a result of not sticking to the training plan. It was a very long and painful walk across London for me to pick up my medal last year.

Looks painful - was that an ITB-related injury by any chance?  Did the tape help at all?  And in what way did you deviate from your plan?

Posted 26.01.13, 5:43pm

It was 'runners knee' i.e. no-one could figure out exactly what the problem was other than being painful!

 

I went armed with a range of ITB straps, patella straps, compression bandages and even the highly fashionable tape!

 

Its hard to say whether any of it helped. It got me to the half-way mark after which no amount of manipulation could help me put any weight on my right leg. I had to settle for the tried and tested method of a hand full of paracetemol and a pint of lager that one supporter very kindly gave to me.

 

It was a beautifully hot day last year - great for spectators, not so much for the runners - but it did make the 13.1 mile walk all the more pleasant. Crossed the finish line just as it started to tip down with rain.

 

I deviated from my plan in every way possible: Missed sessions, tried to make up for runs I missed, tried to run faster than I should, tried to fit in other events to run in, didn't cross-train..

 

I probably did the opposite of everything advised on this site, even including running in new shoes and wearing clothing I had never worn before! (Well.. it was a blisteringly hot day..)

 

Posted 28.01.13, 2:14pm

Quoted from Sir_Cowarde_de_Custarde:

One of the good things about London is that no speed is too slow, and there will still be people behind you, even if it takes 7 hours to finish.  Katie Price did that sort of time a couple of years ago.  While I'm not her biggest fan, I admire her for sticking at it and making sure she finished.  Compare that with the efforts of those "elite" athletes who decide they are not going to win so drop out after 15 miles or so - and some of them are PAID for being there.

One tip I would give, especially if it's a warm day: get yourself a water bottle you can carry with you as some of the drinks stations do run out, and you would not want to go three quarters of an hour between drinks if you get really unlucky.

Very harsh on the elite athletes and not a valid comparison in any way. For them running is a job that takes over every single aspect of their life in a way that your average jogger can barely contemplate - they live like ascetic monks for most of the year. They have a limited shelf life, a high injury risk & a very competitive business where only the very cream earn a decent wage. For many running is the only chance they have to avoid a life of extreme poverty. They have no choice but to be ruthless about race performances, and finishing a race for the sake of it makes no sense at all if they can save something for another day. Many club runners who jog round endless marathons seem to compare themselves to these guys but really, it's a joke. You can't actually run more than a very few marathons in a year the way they do it. The hit on the nervous system is immense.

For amateurs on the other hand just getting round can be the highlight of their whole running career and they can happily milk the applause from friends & family for some time (even if they walked half of it...).

Posted 28.01.13, 4:49pm

I was watching last year's Berlin Marathon at the corner they turn to come in sight of the Brandenburg Gate, less than a mile from the finish. The leaders had gone past a few mins before and the rest of the elites were starting to steadily trickle through. Then 2 of them dropped out. 1 minute they were racing each other full pelt, the next minute they both just stopped and started walking through the crowd. Didn't understand that.

Posted 29.01.13, 8:48am

Pacemakers...??Wink...or perhaps they were really like those race horses who had been backed by some dodgy footballers not to finish the race..?either is possible, however inlikely. it's a conspiracy!

Posted 29.01.13, 8:55am

Strange point in the race for pacemakers to drop out and they weren't wearing the pacemaker vests. The two of them looked a bit pissed off as if something had happened but they didn't look to be in any major distress.

Posted 29.01.13, 9:08am

Perhaps they realised they were just out of the prize money? Or were told by coach not to "spoil" their record (and therefore earning potential) by finishing outside top ten or something like that. Or perhaps even they droped out to allow someone in their team/coaching group/country a higher placed finish. Shouldnt underestimate the professionalism of some running stables

Posted 29.01.13, 9:13am

Professionalism   ≈   cheating            Surprised

Posted 29.01.13, 9:28am

hmmm. Maybe I should jump on the back of a motorbike and do some investigating. If I get funding I'll let you know when the programme airs.

Posted 29.01.13, 10:09am