The 60 Minute 10k

Aiming to run 10k in under an hour? Find out how to train in order to duck under that 60-minute milestone.

An image of The 60 Minute 10k

Whether you’re a relative newcomer or a seasoned runner looking to revise your personal bests, setting your sights on a 60-minute 10k will give you new found motivation and provide your training with a powerful sense of purpose. So how do you crack a 10k in under an hour? Check out these top tips to set you on your way.

Go the distance

You’ll need to prepare both body and mind for running 10k in an hour and there’s no better way to do this than by covering the race distance comfortably in training. This means including one longer run into your schedule every week.

Long runs will enhance some of the key training adaptations needed for increased endurance, meaning that you’ll be able to run faster without fatiguing.

Long runs will enhance some of the key training adaptations needed for increased endurance, meaning that you’ll be able to run faster without fatiguing. You don’t however need to run super long if you’re training for 10k as this could potentially leave you too fatigued to reap the benefits of your faster sessions.

Aim to build your long run up to 12-14 km. Don’t worry too much about the pace initially, the purpose should simply be to spend some time on your feet. This can be a great confidence booster so you know that on race day you can go the distance.

Sharpen up with a 5k

If you’re looking to nudge your 10k personal best down to 60 minutes then you’ll need to train at a variety of paces, including some running at slightly faster than your 10k race pace. This, in essence, should make 10k race pace feel a little easier when you return to it. A great way to include some slightly faster running with company is to incorporate one or two 5k races into your training programme.

Running a local 5k is also a useful way to gain race experience over a shorter distance before the main event. Not only will this give you some objective feedback as to how your training is progressing and your current fitness levels, but it will also allow you to practice key aspects of your pre-race routine.

Get familiar with race pace

A 60-minute 10k equates to 6:00/km pace or 9:39/mile to be precise! Although this pace may look a little daunting on paper, don’t let it scare you. Like anything, the more you practice it, the more comfortable and confident you will become with it.

Interval training is a really effective way of doing race pace specific work as the recoveries between repetitions enable you to maintain that pace.

Try including some running at this pace at least once a week. Interval training is a really effective way of doing race pace specific work as the recoveries between repetitions enable you to maintain that pace.

If you run with a Garmin or similar GPS gadget then it is worth bearing in mind that these devices can be a little inaccurate and inconsistent at times. For this reason, it can be a good idea to use an athletics track for some of your race pace running in order to help you control your speed and lock into race pace.

Complement running with some cross training

Cross training is a great way of doing some additional aerobic work without the impact. By adding a cross training workout into your weekly mix you can reduce your risk of sustaining an overuse injury, strengthen alternative muscle groups that are not predominantly used when running and increase your aerobic fitness.

Remember that as long as you elevate your heart rate your cardiovascular system doesn’t know the difference between running and other forms of aerobic activity. Aqua jogging, cycling, circuit training and elliptical training are all excellent cross training choices for runners.

Run for charity

Be a champion for children

A better future for seriously ill children STARTS HERE More >